why i left the icoc

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why i left the icoc 741
why i left the icoc 741

I left the ICO. I was a founder of an ICO, and it took me months to realize that selling is difficult. The people who are buying don’t want to buy what you’re selling.

The first step in any sales process should be understanding your customer’s pain points, but this isn’t possible when they have no idea what you do or offer. This blog post will walk through how we tried marketing our product before realizing that selling is difficult and moving on to other things.

This is a long-form post with no numbers or bullet points. It’s not an interview, nor is it in response to any questions. This blog post contains my thoughts on the difficulties of selling ICOs and why I left mine. The following are just three examples of how we tried marketing our product before realizing that selling was difficult:

I created videos about what our company does, but found that this didn’t work because they were too short – people had no idea where to go from there;

We reached out to “influencers” who have large social media followings for advice on how best to market our product, but none really responded (perhaps because they knew deep down that pitching something you don’t know anything about is tough);

We listened to startup podcasts and read articles on how it’s best to market your company, but we found that most of this advice was outdated.

I decided to leave the ICO because I could no longer convince myself (and my team) that selling an ICO would be a relatively straightforward process – at least not for us. The problem is that there are just so many variables – different audiences, their tastes in content, beliefs and views on blockchain technologies, etc.; we couldn’t figure out which type of marketing strategy suited our product best. And if you’re unsure as to whether or not something will work for someone else… well then what makes you think it’ll work for them?

The following sentences have been used in the long-form content.

Closing thoughts: this was our first ever ICO and everything we learned is that it’s not a decision to be taken lightly. We believe that there are still many ways for us to grow – but if you’re someone looking at an ICO right now, I would advise taking your time with research before making any investments or commitments.

In conclusion:

We left the ICO because marketing our product wasn’t as easy as we originally anticipated (we could no longer convince ourselves) and weren’t sure which type of strategy would work best for our niche audience; It doesn’t matter how much research you do on whether something will work for somebody else, what matters is whether it’ll work for you.

This was our first ever ICO and everything we learned is that it’s not a decision to be taken lightly. We believe that there are still many ways for us to grow – but if you’re someone looking at an ICO right now, I would advise taking your time with research before making any investments or commitments.

In conclusion: the reality of running an ICO isn’t what people think it is (and we couldn’t convince ourselves otherwise). It doesn’t matter how much research you do on whether something will work for somebody else, what matters is whether it’ll work for you.”

“It’s difficult,” he said. “But selling isn’t easy either.” This seemingly simple sentence