why has increasing farm production failed to help prevent malnutrition

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why has increasing farm production failed to help prevent malnutrition 693
why has increasing farm production failed to help prevent malnutrition 693

A new report from the World Bank shows that the number of hungry people in the world has increased to 821 million. This is a 10% increase since 2000 and more than 100 million people have been added to this group over just one year. The hunger problem is not getting any better, but it is also not going away either. Why does increasing farm production seem so ineffective at solving malnutrition?

The World Bank’s report reveals that the main reason why malnutrition persists is because of poverty. The poorest households have little to no access to nutritious food, while in developing countries like India and Zimbabwe more than half of all children suffer from malnutrition. But at the same time this does not mean that farms are doing nothing for hunger prevention – there are many other ways in which agriculture can help fix it!

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Blog post title: How do Farms Combat Malnutrition?  Description: how do farms combat malnutrition

Blog post content: Why has Increasing Farm Production Failed to Help Prevent Malnutrition?  Description: why has increasing farm production failed to help prevent malnutrition.

Why has Increasing Farm Production Failed to Help Prevent Malnutrition?  Description: why has increasing farm production failed to help prevent malnutrition.

The most common form of malnourishment is under-nutrition, which results in stunted growth and low muscle mass. This can be caused by the lack of protein or micronutrients such as zinc, iron, vitamin A etc. Food shortages are a major cause for this type of malnutrition because people will eat less food when they find that it is not available at all times. If there is an increase in agricultural production then prices should decrease too due to increased supply; however this may only have short term benefits if those with access cannot afford the lower priced food products. For example , in India, the poorest people can only afford to buy food at a price that is more expensive than what they would be able to purchase if prices were lower. This means that while there may be an increase in production it does not necessarily mean that this will reduce malnutrition because those without access cannot take advantage of these opportunities.

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In the 1980s, more than a billion people were at risk of malnutrition.

However, by 2015 this number had dwindled to just over 800 million. The obvious question that arises from these statistics is: why does increasing farm production fail to help prevent malnutrition?

The answer lies in distribution and access. Malnutrition occurs when someone cannot gain access to food or choose what foods they do eat. If anything, increased productivity actually increases hunger because it has contributed to higher food prices and decreased availability for many populations already struggling with poverty and poor infrastructure (Schmickle). When countries are unable to make crops profitable due to high input costs and low crop yields, farmers have less incentive -or ability-to produce enough edible goods for their

This means that those who can afford meat, dairy and other high protein foods are able to eat enough food which has the essential nutrients needed for health and development – but in countries where livestock production consumes more land than crop production or where there is little access to nutritious food, malnutrition affects large numbers of people. The consequences are often severe with an increase in child mortality rates as well as stunted growth due to lack of nutrition during these formative years for the human body.

There’s no single answer when it comes to reducing malnutrition worldwide – instead each country needs their own tailored approach using all available resources such as agricultural diversification, increased availability of healthy foods (especially locally),