which of the following explains why elements in column 17 (the halogens) are very reactive?

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which of the following explains why elements in column 17 the halogens are very reactive 993
which of the following explains why elements in column 17 the halogens are very reactive 993

All elements in the halogens column are very reactive because they have an electron configuration that is more stable when it has eight electrons in its outermost shell. This means that these elements will be willing to give up one of their valence electrons, which is a requirement for them to attain stability.

In addition, these elements have a strong attraction to electrons due to the presence of a full outer shell.

The amount that an element is reactive depends on how it reacts with other substances in its environment and not just because it has eight valence electrons like other very reactive elements such as hydrogen or oxygen do. This means that chlorine will react much more readily than sodium for example even though they both share the same electron configuration-sodium can only be made reactive by bringing another substance into close proximity (i.e., reacting with fluorine). Chlorine, however, can form compounds with many different types of atoms in its surroundings so long as there are available bonds between them. The stability of this compound then determines how likely the chlorine molecule is to react with other substances around it.

Because chlorine has a large number of available bonds, and because these are strong enough for some reactions but not all (i.e., they form compounds), the element can be both reactive and unreactive depending on its situation in the environment-reacting if an opportunity arises or remaining unchanged when there is no such occasion.

Reactivity also depends on how strongly two atoms’ electrons attract each other: elements that have less attraction between their unpaired electrons will tend to have higher rates of reaction than those where this force is stronger due to things like overlapping electron orbitals which holds them together more tightly. This means that fluorine reacts most readily out of the halogens while bromine does not react easily.

As the halogens are all in column 17, they have a strong tendency to form ions and become charged particles with unpaired electrons that can be found on either side of the periodic table due to their instability: this is what makes them so reactive as it means they will try and change state if given half a chance-reacting with other elements or becoming less negative when reacting towards an electron. The more powerful ionic bonds formed by these reactions mean that compounds made from one or more halogen atoms are highly reactive; sometimes even explosive! Chlorine’s place as top contender for most dangerous chemical element is well deserved because its high reactivity has been used both positively and negatively suchs as chlorine being essential for life (as it forms the chemical bonds in proteins) and chlorine being used as a weapon (e.g. World War One).

halogens are very reactive because to form ions, become charged particles with unpaired electrons-this makes them so reactive as they’re unstable – change state if given half a chance by reacting with other elements or becoming less negative when react towards an electron; more powerful ionic bond formed = highly reactive compounds made from halogen atoms which can be explosive! Chlorine’s place as top contender for most dangerous element well deserved: high reactivity has been both positively (chlorine forming protein bonds essential for life) and negatively (weaponry e.g WWI), such that its power is sometimes too much of